Adobe Reader DC, Remove side tools panel by default

After digging around, there seems to be a solution to remove that side panel that takes up screen space, every time you  start Adobe Reader DC.

[you have to have admin rights to do this]
Go to the install directory using explorer.

C:\Program Files (x86)\Adobe\Acrobat Reader\DC\Reader\AcroApp\ENU

( If you have another language, go to another directory there, in my case “NLD”)

Create a new subfolder to move files to and move 3 files from the “ENU” folder into the newly created folder:

AppCenter_R.aapp
Home.aapp
Viewer.aapp

Open a PDF file and now there should be no tools panel.

Works with Windows10

Hope this helps you.

 

Found at https://forums.adobe.com/thread/1817184

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Configure SSL on an HP Aruba 2530-48G-PoEP Switch (J9772A)

Log in admin using ssh (with your favourite ssh client) or (serial) console cable.

config
crypto pki identity-profile Profile subject

Now enter some certificate parameters
You can enter all you like, e.g.

Enter Common Name(CN) : Switch
Enter Org Unit(OU) : ICT
Enter Org Name(O) : Customer
Enter Locality(L) : Amsterdam
Enter State(ST) : State
Enter Country(C) : NL

then, type

crypto pki enroll-self-signed certificate-name certificate
web-management ssl
save

Now ssl is enabled and you can reach your switch using https.

If you didn’t configure an ip-address yet, you see the current ip address using

show ip
Posted in aruba, cli, hp, switch | Comments Off on Configure SSL on an HP Aruba 2530-48G-PoEP Switch (J9772A)

Exchange 2016 Have a receive connector relay outside the domain.

There’s a powershell cmd for that:

New-ReceiveConnector -Name "Anonymous Relay" -Usage Custom -AuthMechanism ExternalAuthoritative -PermissionGroups ExchangeServers -Bindings x.x.x.x:25 -RemoteIpRanges x.x.x.x

(or create a receive connector with the right settings) And then

Get-ReceiveConnector "Anonymous Relay" | Add-ADPermission -User "NT AUTHORITY\ANONYMOUS LOGON" -ExtendedRights "Ms-Exch-SMTP-Accept-Any-Recipient"
Posted in Exchange 2016, powershell | Comments Off on Exchange 2016 Have a receive connector relay outside the domain.

Exchange 2016 Restart Transport Service powershell

Ran into this earlier today, had to restart the Exchange 2016 transport service using powershell only! It turned out to be easy.

Restart-Service MSExchangeTransport

To list all Exchange services:

Get-Service *Exchange*
Posted in Exchange 2016, powershell | Comments Off on Exchange 2016 Restart Transport Service powershell

User folder displayed as “Documents”: Remove desktop.ini

A users’ folder is displayed as “Documents” and you don’t want that.

To e.g. remove desktop.ini files (which are hidden: use -force):

Get-ChildItem "\\SERVER\d$\Users\Userdata\" -recurse -filter desktop.ini -force | foreach ($_) {remove-item $_.fullname -force}

This deletes all the desktop.ini files and will help you see the normal folder structure.
It may be nasty for the users.. or not. Up to you.

Found at http://www.kevin-burke.co.uk/windows-server-technologies/home-folder-shows-documents-folder/

 

Hope this helps you!

Posted in File sharing, powershell | Comments Off on User folder displayed as “Documents”: Remove desktop.ini

Sonicwall OID’s

For internal purposes I had to monitor some snmp facts of a sonicwall.

Here’s the OID list

Sonicwall CPU usage as percent
.1.3.6.1.4.1.8741.1.3.1.3.0
 
Sonicwall Memory usage as percent
.1.3.6.1.4.1.8741.1.3.1.4.0
 
Sonicwall Maximum Connections
.1.3.6.1.4.1.8741.1.3.1.1.0

Sonicwall Current Connections
.1.3.6.1.4.1.8741.1.3.1.2.0
 
Sonicwall Firmware version: 
.1.3.6.1.4.1.8741.2.1.1.3.0

Sonicwall Serial:
.1.3.6.1.4.1.8741.2.1.1.2.0

Sonicwall ROM:
.1.3.6.1.4.1.8741.2.1.1.4.0

Sonicwall System Description:
.1.3.6.1.2.1.1.1.0

Luck may vary (there are many different type of (Dell) Sonicwall appliances)

Hope this helps you.

Posted in OID, snmp | Comments Off on Sonicwall OID’s

Get all different types of mailboxes in Exchange 2010 and 2016

I had to get the amount of the different types of mailboxes that are available in Exchange.
Exchange 2010 and 2016 in this case.

As I had to execute this as a script I ran into the problem that you have a ‘bare’ powershell and thus first need to connect to Exchange.

For Exchange 2010, note the name of the snapin.

Exchange 2010 – Get Number of all Mailboxes (including +1 for a system mailbox)

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.E2010
(get-mailbox -resultsize unlimited).count

Exchange 2010 – Get Number of Equipment Mailboxes

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.E2010
Get-mailbox -recipienttypedetails EquipmentMailbox -resultsize unlimited | Measure-Object | Select-Object -expand Count

Exchange 2010 – Get Number of Room Mailboxes

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.E2010
Get-mailbox -recipienttypedetails RoomMailbox -resultsize unlimited | Measure-Object | Select-Object -expand Count

Exchange 2010 – Get Number of Shared Mailboxes

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.E2010
Get-mailbox -recipienttypedetails SharedMailbox -resultsize unlimited | Measure-Object | Select-Object -expand Count

Exchange 2010 – Get Number of User Mailboxes

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.E2010
Get-mailbox -recipienttypedetails UserMailbox -resultsize unlimited | Measure-Object | Select-Object -expand Count

 

For Exchange 2016, note the name of the snapin. The actual powershell commands to receive the info are the same as with Exchange 2010.

Exchange 2010 – Get Number of all Mailboxes (including +1 for a system mailbox)

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.Snapin
(get-mailbox -resultsize unlimited).count

Exchange 2010 – Get Number of Equipment Mailboxes

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.Snapin
Get-mailbox -recipienttypedetails EquipmentMailbox -resultsize unlimited | Measure-Object | Select-Object -expand Count

Exchange 2010 – Get Number of Room Mailboxes

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.Snapin
Get-mailbox -recipienttypedetails RoomMailbox -resultsize unlimited | Measure-Object | Select-Object -expand Count

Exchange 2010 – Get Number of Shared Mailboxes

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.Snapin
Get-mailbox -recipienttypedetails SharedMailbox -resultsize unlimited | Measure-Object | Select-Object -expand Count

Exchange 2010 – Get Number of User Mailboxes

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.Snapin
Get-mailbox -recipienttypedetails UserMailbox -resultsize unlimited | Measure-Object | Select-Object -expand Count

Hope this helps you!
Cheers!

Posted in Exchange 2010, Exchange 2016, powershell | Comments Off on Get all different types of mailboxes in Exchange 2010 and 2016

Get a list of all computers in Active Directory with date lastlogon and OS

I needed to list all computers in use at customers, with os, and for the less diligently maintained AD’s also if they were still in use. You can obtain this by reading the value of lastlogondate of a machine account.

Get-ADcomputer -Filter * -Properties * | Sort LastLogonDate | FT Name, LastLogonDate, OperatingSystem
Posted in Active Directory, powershell | Comments Off on Get a list of all computers in Active Directory with date lastlogon and OS

Active Directory Powershell get [the count of] all enabled users in a certain OU [but not in sub OU’s]

For our internal use, I devised a powershell command that lists all enabled users in a certain OU, but filtering out those in sub OU’s.

Unfortunately this is not a dynamic process, since it is based on the current implementation of OU’s, meaning the humans laid their hands on it. So depending on your setup you may need to exclude some sub OU’s that you don’t want to count.

First I want to list all users, then only in a certain OU to find that I want only enabled users, oh and leave out those in sub-OU’s. Oh and only the count please. Okay.

e.g:

(Get-ADUser -LDAPFilter "(&(sAMAccountName=*)(!userAccountControl:1.2.840.113556.1.4.803:=2))" -SearchBase 'OU=Users,OU=Customer,DC=WindowsDomain,DC=DomainExtension' | Where-Object { $_.DistinguishedName -notmatch 'Service Accounts|OtherAccounts'}).Count

(I think .Count doesn’t count to 1 (coz then it’s not an array), be aware of that)

Hope this helps you.
Cheers!

 

Posted in Active Directory, powershell | Comments Off on Active Directory Powershell get [the count of] all enabled users in a certain OU [but not in sub OU’s]

Exchange 2016 and SMTP speed

In order to have Exchange SMTP speed up a little you can change some default values.

Some of those values can be found here
https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb232205(v=exchg.160).aspx

So if you want to change some of those value, to accept more mail at the same time, and deliver faster (if your machine can handle it, because you believe it is sooooo fast) you could do:

( Warning: you deviate from Microsoft Standards here, plus
Warning: this way you set it for ALL Transport services )

Get-TransportService | Set-TransportService -MaxOutboundConnections 40

Get-TransportService | Set-TransportService -MaxConcurrentMailboxSubmissions 40

Get-TransportService | Set-TransportService -MaxConcurrentMailboxDeliveries 40

I find MaxOutboundConnections and MaxConnectionRatePerMinute to be fairly OK default settings for a small corporation, but you can go faster!

If you want to change those too, do, e.g. twice as much:

Get-TransportService | Set-TransportService -MaxOutboundConnections 2000

Get-TransportService | Set-TransportService -MaxConnectionRatePerMinute 2400

And there’s tarpitting ofcourse, that adds an extra delay. (mind you, tarpitting has its reasons)

If you want to lookup the current values on your server, do

Get-ReceiveConnector | Select Name, Tarpitinterval

If you want to turn that off do:

Get-ReceiveConnector | Set-ReceiveConnector -TarpitInterval 0

Be sure to restart the transport service.

Always do a get command, just in case you have not noticed its values.

Of course you can do calculations on how much bandwidth your server has, can handle, and can spew out, and how many IOPS are needed for average mail transactions to your Exchange database, etc, but this post is not about that. I usually list how to do stuff. Not how to do stuff proper 🙂 Also, never say, tinkerist.com has it so it must be true. I don’t have the time discussing if something is true. What I hope that is that most of the time it works.

Hope this helps you!

P.S. For Exchange 2010 you can do things like the following, but look them up first, so that you know what you did, before you screwed up your exchange machine.

Get-ReceiveConnector | Set-ReceiveConnector -MessageRateLimit 4000
Get-ReceiveConnector | Set-ReceiveConnector -MessageRateSource None
Get-ReceiveConnector | Set-ReceiveConnector -MaxInboundConnectionPercentagePerSource 30
Posted in Exchange 2016, smtp | Comments Off on Exchange 2016 and SMTP speed